Posts

Freeze Peach!

If you've spent any amount of time on online forums, you've probably seen it happen. A new poster arrives, and proceeds to make an ass of himself. (It is very rarely "herself".) If your forum is a good one, a moderator soon appears and makes it plain that the new guy needs to chill. 
In most cases, it ends there. The new guy either learns to plays nice or slinks off to find another forum with looser standards of civility. But all too often, the asshole digs in his heels. 
The arguments are always the same: This is a matter of principle! The right to be a jerk is the most important thing!  People are too thin-skinned! Moderation is a violation of Free Speech! The mods are a bunch of fascists! 
The forum locals have a good laugh at his feeble arguments, blind arrogance, and self-centered pleading. Eventually the mods get tired of his impotent raging against the machine and ban him. The last few years have seen this same experience played out on a larger scale.

The rise and fall of free to play

I love the idea of pay-what-you-want. It warms my socialist heart to see a work of art thrive in spite of being available free. Welcome to Night Vale is a good example. Any web comic or you tube show with a Patreon button qualifies. There are a lot of those, and many of them are successful. Those who have money to spare subsidize those who do not.

That's why I'm a big fan of free-to-play games. It's an easy thing to do badly, of course. But done well, it can allow a pay-what-you-want experience to make enough money to support the massive development expense of a AAA game.


Fin puts the bi in bicep curls.

Image

D&D 5 Homebrew Magic items A-Z, part 1

The magic items chapter int the 5th ed Dungeon Master's Guide has just a few gaps. I've been trying my hand at re-creating some old favorites in the Fifth edition idiom. Just for kicks, I'll post them in alphabetical order. (Because all the ones starting with A are already done.)


Extra Credits

I love game design, and even started a blog devoted to the subject. My big red notebook has pages of observations and thoughts intended as material for said blog. But I'm thinking of shutting it down, now than I've discovered Extra Credits.

They're good. All the things I wanted to say about games, they had already said. And more clearly than I could. Oh, sure, there are some things I could ramble about, like varying degrees of persistence in the same game.

Then again, I haven't gotten through the whole archive yet. Maybe they do cover it.

D&D 5 Homebrew: PC Lizardfolk

Lizardfolk In the spectrum between civilized and savage, the lizardfolk are on the the most primitive extreme. With their stout claws and thick skin, they have little need for tools, clothing, or shelter.

The few Lizardfolk who venture out of their ancestral homes are unprepared to deal with the outside world. Many end up pressed into service as foot soldiers for some evil master. A lizardfolk hero is a rare thing indeed.

D&D 5 Homebrew: PC Kobold

Fifth edition has been occupying my thoughts lately. I've been putting together races and backgrounds. Here's my first effort:  Kobold Kobolds are the underdogs of the world. All over the world, kobolds are under the rule of other creatures, whether slaves of gnolls or supplicants to a fickle dragon. They fatalistically accept their lot in life, content to be under the protection or a powerful master. Or so it seems. You never know if a kobold is sincere, or simply waiting for the right time to stab his former master in the back.

In the few cases where kobolds are autonomous, they are nearly always forced into the most desolate and unforgiving places. They live in played-out mines, long-abandoned ruins, and other places deemed unfit for habitation by other races. The cling to these enclaves with ruthless tenacity, and they do not appreciate intruders.